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Counting the dimples on my balls for fun.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by gamerfreak View Post
    Courses are expensive as fuck to maintain. Our club spends around $50k-$75k per month on course maintenance.
    I don't doubt it one bit. Where I live we are over saturated with courses and they are closing left and right. It will be interesting to see what that does to the price and demand. I like getting a whole slot to myself..

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Spider Monkey View Post
      But generally, skiing is another rich white man sport.
      Fucking right it is.

      Originally posted by gamerfreak View Post
      Courses are expensive as fuck to maintain. Our club spends around $50k-$75k per month on course maintenance.
      I wonder how a ski resort compares -- probably exponentially more.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by jip View Post
        I wonder how a ski resort compares -- probably exponentially more.
        Not sure. I wouldn’t think exponentially more though, as long as there isn’t as much work in the off-season. A course is pretty much year-round, even on the east coast.

        What equipment do they have ascide from the lifts and snow throwers? Does something spread the snow around to make it all even?

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        • #19
          A good resort is MUCH bigger than a course.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by UCP View Post
            A good resort is MUCH bigger than a course.
            And the maintenance crew is probably a bit more skilled than your average lawn caretaker. I have no clue what the maintenance costs for either but I really wouln't doubt if a good resort cost more to maintain yearly than a good golf course. Seasons only affect the service staff costs (even then, by that?), but I can see repairs and structure maintenance being year round.

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            • #21
              Not to mention the equipment is generally much larger.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Spider Monkey View Post
                You probably only need 3-4 lessons bro. That is all I needed to grasp the concepts of each swing. Then consistency can only be learned at the range (or what ever you just built) after that IMO.

                I made a major breakthrough with my driver swing this year. Consistency went up to a 4 out of 5 swings with well over 200yd distance each time. The change was in my back swing. Go back farther, slower. Changed my entire game. Finished my last round at 88. That's good enough for me to maintain with the big dogs. If I slowed down and gave each swing a 2 minute prep time I could probably knock a few more swings off that because I get over confident and my strength tries to creep in at times. Regardless, I'm extremely pleased with where my game is now that I'm 3ish years into it.

                I can't wait for winter ball. I get the courses all to myself. I dusted off the spiked boots last Friday.

                Where are you putting your new set up?
                How would you describe your old backswing? I'm not sure how many lessons I will actually do, probably more than 3 or 4, but that's brobably what I'll need to get my striking settled out. I am hoping that I can get good advice on a swing that isn't likely to injure my back, as that seems to be super common already in golf.

                After I get strike and swing reasonable I want to use the SkyTrak to establish and work on my club gaps. When I get that as close as possible I want to get fit and get a good set that will allow me to tighten that up more. Hopefully that's in the spring.

                THen it's on to actually playing and working on course management, which I will probably get lessons again for.

                I want to start chipping and putting as a routine on Saturday or Sunday morning.

                By the time the next company outing happens I should be far, far better than anyone in my group, I was already doing fine.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by UCP View Post

                  How would you describe your old backswing? I'm not sure how many lessons I will actually do, probably more than 3 or 4, but that's brobably what I'll need to get my striking settled out. I am hoping that I can get good advice on a swing that isn't likely to injure my back, as that seems to be super common already in golf.

                  After I get strike and swing reasonable I want to use the SkyTrak to establish and work on my club gaps. When I get that as close as possible I want to get fit and get a good set that will allow me to tighten that up more. Hopefully that's in the spring.

                  THen it's on to actually playing and working on course management, which I will probably get lessons again for.

                  I want to start chipping and putting as a routine on Saturday or Sunday morning.

                  By the time the next company outing happens I should be far, far better than anyone in my group, I was already doing fine.
                  My old backswing went exactly as this every single time (when I was thinking). Each step I incorporated from my lessons.


                  Ape Arms: Let the arms dangle with club to get right distance from ball
                  Quicksand: Bury heels
                  3-1: The amount of pressure my hands are holding the club. 3 out of 10 for left, 1 out of 10 for right.
                  Ass out.
                  Swing is a 3 count. At two your at the back of the swing. 1.. 2... 3...

                  What I changed was I go back slower and lower my left shoulder much more, and almost pause at the peak of the back swing and then get a little bit more torque out of my wrists which almost takes the back swing speed completely out of the equation. I still do the three count, but 1 and 2 take more time. It creates a finesse that removes my constant attempts to use strength to get the ball out. I found the ball going much straighter and actually in the air every time for at least 225-250 yards consistently. I still blast an occasional worm burner, but that just tells me I didn't drop my shoulder enough and I didn't twist the wrists for that extra torque in the back swing.

                  Club gaps area huge problem for me under 150 yards. I'm pretty good inside of 50 but between those two numbers I often overshoot the green because I have one club to use in a 100 yard gap..

                  This is the only thing I've ever done that's challenged me at every single step. I think that's why I'm obsessed with it. When I latch on to something, I do it to death. I don't think I'll ever be so good I can kill golf.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by IamDeMan View Post
                    And the maintenance crew is probably a bit more skilled than your average lawn caretaker. I have no clue what the maintenance costs for either but I really wouln't doubt if a good resort cost more to maintain yearly than a good golf course. Seasons only affect the service staff costs (even then, by that?), but I can see repairs and structure maintenance being year round.
                    I have no clue about resorts either.

                    Two more fun facts though. The greens at our club have been turfed a few times. Putting green sod is something ridiculous li think around $100/sqft.

                    Getting all the bunkers re-dug and sand replaced was around $350k.

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                    • #25
                      A ski resort is a cash cow in the good times. Employees there don't make dick. A golf course on the other hand is always scraping to get into the black. If a course was cheap, your local 9 hole executive course would have marble greens instead of crabgrass greens.

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                      • #26
                        Our 9 hole at work barely breaks even.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by flip View Post
                          Our 9 hole at work barely breaks even.
                          I bet it looks like shit too. Comparing to an exclusive private course of course.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by gamerfreak View Post
                            Not sure. I wouldn’t think exponentially more though, as long as there isn’t as much work in the off-season. A course is pretty much year-round, even on the east coast.

                            What equipment do they have ascide from the lifts and snow throwers? Does something spread the snow around to make it all even?
                            Yes, they have massive machines that groom the runs -- the snow has to be spread out evenly at least once a day.

                            They have to maintain the runs during the off-season -- if they let brush and grass grow, there won't be a run come winter.

                            The cost of maintaining just the lifts is probably on par with a golf course, honestly.

                            Then there are all the specialized staff -- you don't need regular patrols of a golf course to ensure your patrons don't die.

                            Any time you are dealing with alpine conditions, shit gets expensive.

                            Originally posted by Spider Monkey View Post
                            A ski resort is a cash cow in the good times. Employees there don't make dick. A golf course on the other hand is always scraping to get into the black. If a course was cheap, your local 9 hole executive course would have marble greens instead of crabgrass greens.
                            In the good times, hell yeah.

                            One bad season, though, and the resort goes under.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by jip View Post

                              Then there are all the specialized staff -- you don't need regular patrols of a golf course to ensure your patrons don't die.
                              Those are volunteers that work in exchange for free tickets for the most part bro.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Spider Monkey View Post
                                Those are volunteers that work in exchange for free tickets for the most part bro.
                                Is that an American thing? Ski Patrol in Canada is both unionized and paid.

                                Not well paid - they are basically specialized first responders with avy training who get paid less than 40k year. But they do get the free pass, so that helps. Hell, in Whistler, that perk is worth thousands. lol

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